Dyeing is always an event!  Such fun to see the many colors, bursts of brilliance, depths and shades .  I’m always amazed by the range from one pot of dye and the resulting surprises from combining two ending dye pots. Below is a sweater made from the many colors of my wool blend heavy worsted weight yarn. Pretty neat! Thanks Mom.

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I use natural dyes  -  creating a “tea” from onion skins or just picked goldenrod, soaking and cooking roots and barks and using extracts from Earthues Natural Dyes. Dyeing is a time to repeat past colors or experiment with color blends, get the brightest yellow from this year’s goldenrod, the deepest reds, the softest pastels from the end of a dye bath and the many colors from overdyeing with indigo or a different color bath.

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I dye raw and washed fleece and the yarns from the farm as well as roving, tagua nut buttons and silk fibers.  Each requires a slightly different preparation. Some dyeing is done as an immersion in a pot of dye and water and some is painted on and then steamed.  I use Alum as a mordant; some fibers are premordanted and others have the mordant added to the dyebath. Due to the grease in the raw fleece, parts of the locks take the dye  differently. After carding into roving and batts, I think the dyed raw fleece yields more depth of color.